[Home]History of Transverse Shunt

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Revision 5 . . March 18, 2009 2:00 pm by Simons Mith [linked to loop]
Revision 4 . . (edit) April 13, 2007 11:58 pm by Simons Mith
  

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The transverse shunt is a form of shunt sharing some characteristics with both the straddle and the strile. Its straddle-like characteristic is that a transverse shunt can cross from one line to another by means of the laterals, but unfortunately it is strile-like in terms of cost. However, a well-timed transverse shunt can be devastating to an opponent's strategy, especially if they thought that by being on another line they were safe from being shunted, but it is a costly manœuvre that it is critical to get exactly right. Many attacking players use it to begin a Dollis Hill – a trick for which Eamon Ruttsborough was justly notorious.
The transverse shunt is a form of shunt sharing some characteristics with both the straddle and the strile. Its straddle-like characteristic is that a transverse shunt can cross from one line to another by means of the laterals, but unfortunately it is strile-like in terms of cost. However, a well-timed transverse shunt can be devastating to an opponent's strategy, especially if they thought that by being on another line they were safe from being shunted, but it is a costly manœuvre that it is critical to get exactly right. Many attacking players use it to begin a Dollis Hill loop – a trick for which Eamon Ruttsborough was justly notorious.

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