[Home]History of Trophies

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Revision 4 . . (edit) April 1, 2007 8:39 pm by Simons Mith
Revision 2 . . September 30, 2004 6:10 pm by Dunx
Revision 1 . . September 30, 2004 6:05 pm by Dunx
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (minor diff, author diff)

Changed: 1c1
There are many trophies and awards in the world of Mornington Crescent, as with any game with such a long and distinguished history. This entry only discusses the main trophies other than the World Championships themselves, although two secondary awards of note at the World Championships are the Wooden Spoon, a prize given to the player who gets out of Spoon in the most imaginative way, and the Glass Hammer, awarded to the player who manages to throw away a sitting victory by sheer bone-headedness.
There are many trophies and awards in the world of Mornington Crescent, as with any game with such a long and distinguished history. This entry only discusses the main trophies other than the World Championships themselves, although two secondary awards of note at the World Championships are the Wooden Spoon, a prize given to the player who gets out of spoon in the most imaginative way, and the Glass Hammer, awarded to the player who manages to throw away a sitting victory by sheer bone-headedness.

Changed: 5c5
* The Ashes fought for annually between English and Australian teams of five over three matches. The name derives from the creation of the trophy in 1862 when, after the Australian team won a narrow victory over the England side, a disgusted spectator burnt the Australians' return tickets and placed them in a tasteful silver salt cellar inscribed with an appropriate message. The original trophy is on display at the IMCS musem. (I understand another sport also has a trophy of a similar name but I have been unable to trace any details)
* The Ashes fought for annually between English and Australian teams of five over three matches. The name derives from the creation of the trophy in 1862 when, after the Australian team won a narrow victory over the England side, a disgusted spectator burnt the Australians' return tickets and placed them in a tasteful silver salt cellar inscribed with an appropriate message. The original trophy is on display at the IMCS museum. (I understand another sport also has a trophy of a similar name but I have been unable to trace any details)

Changed: 8c8
* '''The Victoria Cross* was instituted in 1875 by the manager of Victoria Station and is awarded to the winner of the annual All-Comers Open championship. Professional players are excluded. Traditionally the winner receives a new set of tokens as well as the medal.
* The Victoria Cross was instituted in 1875 by the manager of Victoria Station and is awarded to the winner of the annual All-Comers Open championship. Professional players are excluded. Traditionally the winner receives a new set of tokens as well as the medal.

Changed: 13c13,20
Note that most of these are international contests between the UK and other nations. There are, of course, other prizes for international contests between non-UK nations such as the Prix de Paris between Germany and Holland but these are more recent innovations. [AxS]
Note that most of these are international contests between the UK and other nations. There are, of course, other prizes for international contests between non-UK nations such as the Prix de Paris between Germany and Holland but these are more recent innovations.

[AxS]

(No mention of the Armitage Shanks Memorial Bowl? - [SM])



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