[Home]Boris

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Changed: 1c1
The condition is somewhat similar to what in chess is known as "zugzwang", or colloquially as "up sh*t creek without a paddle" - the player, though he may be in a strong position, has no good move, while in a position where s/he cannot pass or farkle, and must thus move and weaken his/her position. Boris Baryshnikov managed to overcome a 43-podume deficit against Mrs Trellis this way in the crucial game of the 1983 World Championship final and thus, from an apparently lost position, won an improbable victory against her, for what was to be the only time he ever beat her in match play.
The condition of Boris is similar to what is known in chess as 'zugzwang', or colloquially as 'up sh*t creek without a paddle' – the player, though he or she may be in a strong position, has no good move immediately available, yet is unable to pass or farkle, and must thus move and weaken his/her position. Boris Baryshnikov used this technique against Mrs Trellis in the crucial game of the 1983 World Championship final. He managed to overcome a 43-podume deficit and thereby won an improbable victory against her from an apparently lost position – the only time he ever beat her in match play.

Changed: 3c3
In fact, for a time after this victory, people used to refer to this situation as "baryshnikov", and indeed this was at one time accepted as the "official" name for the condition: but his first name was easier to spell and pronounce, and thus became more popularly used, and has since been adopted as the standard name purely for the sake of argument. (CAMREC, as usual, were the last to recognise this designation as "official", only accepting it in the Holland Park 2000 ruleset.)
In fact, for a time after this victory, people used to refer to this situation as 'Baryshnikov', and it became accepted as the official name for the condition. But since his first name is easier to spell and pronounce it eventually became more popularly used, and has now been adopted as the standard name purely for the sake of simplicity. (As usual, CAMREC were the last to recognise this designation as 'official', only accepting it when the Holland Park 2000 ruleset was released.)

Added: 5a6,7


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The condition of Boris is similar to what is known in chess as 'zugzwang', or colloquially as 'up sh*t creek without a paddle' – the player, though he or she may be in a strong position, has no good move immediately available, yet is unable to pass or farkle, and must thus move and weaken his/her position. Boris Baryshnikov used this technique against Mrs Trellis in the crucial game of the 1983 World Championship final. He managed to overcome a 43-podume deficit and thereby won an improbable victory against her from an apparently lost position – the only time he ever beat her in match play.

In fact, for a time after this victory, people used to refer to this situation as 'Baryshnikov', and it became accepted as the official name for the condition. But since his first name is easier to spell and pronounce it eventually became more popularly used, and has now been adopted as the standard name purely for the sake of simplicity. (As usual, CAMREC were the last to recognise this designation as 'official', only accepting it when the Holland Park 2000 ruleset was released.)

[JLE]


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Last edited April 21, 2007 11:39 pm by Simons Mith (diff)
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