[Home]History of Mornington Chess

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Revision 6 . . (edit) March 30, 2007 1:40 am by Simons Mith
Revision 2 . . November 19, 2004 7:16 pm by 82-69-54-207.dsl.in-addr.zen.co.uk
Revision 1 . . November 19, 2004 7:14 pm by 82-69-54-207.dsl.in-addr.zen.co.uk
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (minor diff, author diff)

Changed: 1,7c1,9
Mornington Chess is a variant of Cress using standard chess pieces and played on the Mornington Crescent map. The winning move is Mornington Checkmate. The mention of 'Mornington' in the winning announcement is in fact merely a historical quirk of the game notation. Just as in chess, checkmate does not require the King to be on any particular square, so too in MCh, and in practice it is possible to win as far out as Preston Road. Attempts by Carl Fronsky in the sixties to adapt modern algebraic chess notation to Mornington Chess met with failure; for this game, English Descriptive notation is still the preferred standard.

By convention, a plain station move carries with it an implicit pawn advance, and castling requires the elephant to be played as well. This usually means the second side to castle gets shunted.

Official Mornington Chess rankings are actually managed by the International Cress Federation rather than by the IMCS. This was one of the few occasions where the official means of determining the correct line of demarcation between Cress and MC variants worked smoothly.

[SM]
Mornington Chess is a variant of Cress using standard chess pieces and played on the Mornington Crescent map. The winning move is Mornington Checkmate. The mention of 'Mornington' in the winning announcement is in fact merely a historical quirk of the game notation. Just as in chess, checkmate does not require the King to be on any particular square, so too in MCh, and in practice it is possible to win as far out as Preston Road. Attempts by [Carl Fronsky]? in the sixties to adapt modern algebraic chess notation to Mornington Chess met with failure; for this game, English Descriptive notation is still the preferred standard.

By convention, a plain station move carries with it an implicit pawn advance, and castling requires the elephant to be played as well. This usually means the second side to castle gets shunted.

Official Mornington Chess rankings are actually managed by the International Cress Federation rather than by the IMCS. This was one of the few occasions where the official means of determining the correct line of demarcation between Cress and MC variants worked smoothly.

[SM]


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