[Home]History of Pivot

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Revision 5 . . April 11, 2007 1:26 am by Simons Mith [Slight reword]
Revision 4 . . (edit) March 29, 2007 12:01 am by Simons Mith [Categories]
Revision 2 . . November 19, 2004 6:26 pm by 82-69-54-207.dsl.in-addr.zen.co.uk
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (author diff)

Changed: 1c1
Once a location (usually a station, but not always) has been pegged it is possible to perform a rotational movement around it, as if it was the centre of a circle or spiral. As most moves in Mornington Crescent are linear, a well-timed pivot can get round obstacles that could not be circumvented in any other way. When performing such a manoeuver, it pays to pay close attention to line velocity and the current level of helical stress; if either is excessive, the pivot manoeuver may fail badly. A Crossmead Spiral or Pettengale Sweep is a (usually) safer methor to approximate a pivot using standard linear rather than rotational moves, and the hazards of incorrectly executing a Crossmead Spiral are already well-documented.
Once a location (usually a station, but not always) has been pegged it is possible to perform a rotational movement around it, as if it was the centre of a circle or spiral. As most moves in Mornington Crescent are linear, a well-timed pivot can get round obstacles that could not be circumvented in any other way. When performing such a manœuvre, it pays to pay close attention to line velocity and the current level of helical stress; if either is excessive, the pivot manœuvre may fail badly. A Crossmead Spiral or Pettengale Sweep is usually a safer method to approximate a pivot using standard linear rather than rotational moves, and even a Crossmead Spiral carries several well-documented hazards if not executed correctly.

Changed: 5c5
Categories: A to Z
Categories: A to Z

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